How to Make Yogurt Part 2, Pictures and Tips

Here are the photos to go along with yesterday’s entry on how to make yogurt.

Pour milk into your container. The kind of container you use to incubate your yogurt will determine the amount of milk, so I can’t really tell you how much to use. If you are using a powdered starter, then fill the container to the top. If you are using yogurt from a previous batch or from the store, then leave some space in the container to allow for the addition of the yogurt.

Measure Out Your Milk

Measure Out Your Milk

Pour the milk into a double boiler and heat to 90*. The point here is to take the chill off the milk, and just warm it. You don’t want to heat it too fast or too high. Otherwise, you’ll scald the milk.

Milk Warming in Double Boiler

Milk Warming in Double Boiler

Pour some of this warm milk back into the container, and add either your powdered starter or 3-4 tablespoons of yogurt. Stir well to dissolve starter into the warm milk.

Dissolve Starter into Milk

Dissolve Starter into Milk

Add the rest of the milk, shake the container a little bit to get the starter through all of the milk. For those using the same type of yogurt maker I am, bring water back up to boil and pour into the yogurt maker to the “fill” line. Put the inner container holding the yogurt inside the canister, and let it sit for between 12-24 hours.

My Two Easiyo Makers in Cabinet above Sink

My Two Easiyo Makers in Cabinet above Sink

When your done incubating the yogurt, let it finish setting up in the refrigerator. You can then choose to strain it. If you do, be sure to catch the whey. I use a muslin bag hung from the door knob over my sink, and I catch the whey in a bowl underneath.

Yogurt Hanging and Straining

Yogurt Hanging and Straining

Catching Whey

Catching Whey

And here is the end result…

Homemade Yogurt

Homemade Yogurt

A couple extra things to remember:

  • Yogurt cultures are beneficial bacteria. Anti-bacterial dish detergent residue could interfere with getting your yogurt to culture properly. Rather than use dish detergent, I rinse everything out, wipe it down, and boil it- including the bag. If you use a bag or tea towel to strain yogurt- just boil it, rather than use laundry detergent that may not entirely rinse away.
  • Commercially prepared yogurt has a variety of additives to get it that thick, creamy consistency, such as gelatin or powdered milk. Sometimes it is difficult to tell the difference in consistency between commercial yogurt and pudding. I do not add anything to my yogurt except perhaps fruit or  maple syrup, but feel free to experiment.

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